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Tritanopia and How Colorblind People See the World by David Sasso

How Colorblind People With Tritanopia See The World.

The photographer behind this explanatory project is David Sasso, known as Redunchained. It was a means of showcasing the world as people with Tritanopia see it.

Tritanopia is a form of colour blindness in which there are not enough cone cells within the retina to respond to blue wavelengths, so the retina cannot differentiate between blue and green.

In addition to Deuteranomalia, there are other vision defects such as Protanopia, where everything is greenish, and Tritanopia, which has green and pink hues. In addition, only one in every three people have monochromacy, or total colour blindness.

These wonderful pictures were taken by Sasso in many different places, including the Three Peaks of Lavaredo, the Braies Lake, the Sila Forest in Calabria, as well as many other places.

Project by David Sasso

Pictures are taken in a variety of places, from the Three Peaks of Lavaredo to the Lake of Braies, both in Italy and in Calabria, in the forest of Sila. This is how the world looks to a colorblind, so I wanted to show that to the public and to myself.

More info: Instagram

The idea was to replicate the vision from the eyes of people colorblind with Tritanopia.

The idea was to replicate the vision from the eyes of people colorblind with Tritanopia

It results in an inability to distinguish blue from green.

tritanopia

tritanopia

tritanopia

tritanopia

How Colorblind People With Tritanopia See The World

How Colorblind People With Tritanopia See The World

How Colorblind People With Tritanopia See The World

How Colorblind People With Tritanopia See The World

How Colorblind People With Tritanopia See The World

How Colorblind People With Tritanopia See The World

How Colorblind People With Tritanopia See The World

How Colorblind People With Tritanopia See The World

How Colorblind People With Tritanopia See The World

How Colorblind People With Tritanopia See The World

How Colorblind People With Tritanopia See The World

Tritanopia – Blue-Yellow Color Blindness

The term blue-yellow color blindness is actually misleading. A person with tritan color blindness confuses blue with green and yellow with violet. Tritanopes are usually not able to mix up the colors orange and yellow, so the term blue-green color blindness may be more accurate.

Tritan defects can affect the short-wavelength cone (S-cone). These can be classified into two categories:

Tritanopia. Those who suffer from tritanopia are dichromats. There are no S-cones present, only long- and medium-wavelength cones.
It is a form of blue-yellow colorblindness, with S-cones present but with some mutation.

It is rare to observe blue-yellow colorblindness. Various studies give different numbers, but the general rule of thumb is that one in 10,000 people is affected. Tritan defects, on the other hand, are autosomal and caused by mutations on chromosome 7. Consequently, women and men are equally vulnerable to tritanopia and tritanomaly.

Tritanopia Color Spectrum

Normal and Tritanopia Color Spectrum

A tritanope is usually less likely to struggle at everyday tasks than a dichromatic individual. Green is associated with good/go, and red with stop/stop, colors we see every day, but researchers have not found a clear answer as to why.

As well as inheriting traitsan defects, one can acquire them as well. This condition may even be reversible, unlike inherited blindness. A person can acquire a defect in two ways: either gradually over time due to aging or instantly through a hard knock to the head.

With age, the eye lens becomes less transparent, causing tritanomalous symptoms. It is rare that they are severe enough to be diagnosed as color blind.

There was a higher incidence of tritanopia among alcoholics. When alcohol was in high concentrations, color recognition was significantly worse in all spectral ranges, but blue-yellow color discrimination errors were significantly higher than red-green color discrimination errors.

Color vision can also be impaired by organic solvent mixtures, even at low concentrations. Blue-yellow was seen to be the most error-prone color spectrum.

The blue-yellow color blindness can also be caused by a hard blow to the front or back of the head.

Tritanopic after an injury to the head is an example of this.

Related: Hatice Korkmaz’s beautiful travel and landscape photography