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At Heligan’s Lost Gardens you will find a living sculpture.

Mud Maid sculpture in The Lost Gardens of Heligan

The Lost Gardens of Heligan’s Living Sculpture Changes With The Seasons.

A magical part of England, Cornwall is steeped in legends of King Arthur and fairytales. A 200-acre restoration project, the Lost Gardens of Heligan are one of Europe’s largest gardens, perfect for explorers, plant lovers, and romantics.

Heligan is full of surprises, and one of them is the Mud Maid sculpture, which is crafted by the brother-sister duo, Pete and Sue Hill. The Lost Gardens’ Woodland Walk has been inseparable from that sculpture since it was originally commissioned in 1997.

Mud Maid, as she is called, is a living sculpture. Thus, the ‘clothes’ and ‘hair’ of this character fluctuate with the seasons as grass, ivy, and moss change. In Spring and Summer, she will appear vibrant. In Autumn and Winter, she will look completely different.

One of the most popular gardens in the UK, the Lost Gardens of Heligan were once forgotten. In light of the incredible popularity of this property, it is hard to comprehend how it remained untouched for 75 years. Cornwall’s Garden was only rediscovered in the 90s and has undergone many changes since.

During the restoration of the botanical gardens, two of its most interesting features were installed.

During the process of restoring the property to its former glory, two rock sculptures were installed on the grounds. These sculptures were created by the local artists Pete and Sue Hill, who are brother and sister.

They were installed in 1997, after the garden had been abandoned since after World War I, as part of a restoration project.

Pictures of Lost Gardens Of Heligan

More info/Credits: PeteAndSueHill.co.uk | Heligan.com

This is the Mud Maid sculpture in The Lost Gardens of Heligan, in Cornwall

This is the Mud Maid sculpture in The Lost Gardens of Heligan, in Cornwall

Mud Maid sculpture in The Lost Gardens of Heligan

Mud Maid sculpture in The Lost Gardens of Heligan

Mud Maid sculpture in The Lost Gardens of Heligan

Mud Maid sculpture in The Lost Gardens of Heligan

Mud Maid sculpture in The Lost Gardens of Heligan

Mud Maid sculpture in The Lost Gardens of Heligan

Mud Maid sculpture in The Lost Gardens of Heligan

Mud Maid sculpture in The Lost Gardens of Heligan

Mud Maid sculpture in The Lost Gardens of Heligan

Mud Maid sculpture in The Lost Gardens of Heligan

Mud Maid sculpture in The Lost Gardens of Heligan

Mud Maid sculpture in The Lost Gardens of Heligan

Mud Maid sculpture in The Lost Gardens of Heligan

Mud Maid and The Giant’s Head, the Hills’ other sculptures, are meant to add a sense of mystery and enrich the woodland experience at Heligan.

A hollow framework made of wood and windbreak netting supported the Mud Maid, which was covered in sticky mud by sculptors brother and sister.

Mud, cement, and sand make up the face of the sculpture.

Originally, it was coated with yogurt to promote lichen growth. Meanwhile, ivy makes up the Maid’s clothes as she is surrounded by Woodsedge and Montbretia.

Heligan, one of Britain’s most famous botanical gardens, was created by the Tremayne family in the 18th century. Before World War I, the Tremanynes employed 22 gardeners to keep the estate prim and proper.

Many gardeners, however, moved to the front once the war began. After the First World War, the estate was in disrepair due to a decrease in gardeners.

It is no surprise that thousands of visitors a year flock to the gardens featuring living sculptures.

The Lost Gardens of Heligan

Mud Maid sculpture in The Lost Gardens of Heligan

Mud Maid sculpture in The Lost Gardens of Heligan

Mud Maid sculpture in The Lost Gardens of Heligan

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