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1980s Personal Computer Ads From The Vault Are Hilarious

Personal Computer Ads From The 1980s

Retro computer ads are our favourite.

During the early 1980s, the computer finally made its way into the home in a big way. Obviously, most of us didn’t know how to use these things, and software and hardware companies were only too eager to tell us what we had to buy.

From dot-matrix printers for the home to word processing software for small businesses. The booming 1980s provided consumers with seemingly unlimited resources to purchase whatever technology was put forth. Then let’s check out some of the sale items.

The advertising for Personal Computers, whether it was software or hardware, promised the moon. The promises of personal computers began to wane as consumers began to appreciate the true capabilities of a computer. The above advertisement literally promotes the idea that your PC can serve as a crystal ball.

Personal Computer Ads From The 1980s Personal Computer Ads From The 1980s

Personal Computer Ads From The 1980s Personal Computer Ads From The 1980s

Personal Computer Ads From The 1980s

Personal Computer Ads From The 1980s

Personal Computer Ads From The 1980s

Personal Computer Ads From The 1980s

Personal Computer Ads From The 1980s

Personal Computer Ads From The 1980s

Personal Computer Ads From The 1980s

Personal Computer Ads From The 1980s

Personal Computer Ads From The 1980s

Personal Computer Ads From The 1980s

Personal Computer Ads From The 1980s

Personal Computer Ads From The 1980s

Personal Computer Ads From The 1980s

Check out: Jackbox games on a TV.

Juki Printer, 1983

Although it looks like something from the far future, this expensive (and noisy!) daisy wheel printer shares more in common with electric typewriters than laser printers. The period character is the only way to print graphics.
Juki Printer, 1983

David Hard Disk Subsystem, 1982

Advertising for computer peripherals was weird in the early days. A series of flimsy 5 1/4-inch floppy disks could be replaced with the David Hard Disk Subsystem, which proposed a whole new world of computing. Konan Corporation
David Hard Disk Subsystem, 1982

How you printed your screen in 1984

Although we take it for granted today, printing your screen was not an option on early Apple computers. To make hard copies of graphics and text, you would have needed something like this FingerPrint printer interface card (complete with a “touch-sensitive button” to be added to keyboards).

How you printed your screen in 1984

Apple IIc, 1984

Schools in the U.S. began to use Apple computers by 1984. Advertisements like these advertised their popularity in American homes.
Apple IIc, 1984

Flight Simulator II, 1984

The SubLogic Flight Simulator has been in use since 1977 and is one of the most successful and enduring computer programs of all time. Commodore, Apple and Atari platforms were all supported by SubLogic’s software. Meanwhile, it licensed Microsoft Flight Simulator, an IBM PC compatible version, in 1982.
Flight Simulator II, 1984

Ghostbusters, the Computer Game, 1984

Of course, one of the hottest movies of 1984 had its own computer game. It was designed and programmed by Activision co-founder David Crane, known for the game Pitfall.
Ghostbusters, the Computer Game, 1984

Atarisoft, 1984

It wasn’t just about productivity and programming in the early days of computers – there were plenty of games, too. IBM and Apple Computers both had arcade hits developed by Atarisoft.

Atarisoft, 1984

Osborne 1, 1982

At 25 pounds, the Obsorne 1 is a bit of a beast, but it was once one of the earliest laptops ever made. Despite its historical importance, Osborne Computer Corporation declared bankruptcy in 1983.

Osborne 1, 1982

North Star Computers, 1982

The North Star Horizon here, one of the earliest multi-user computers with a built-in drive, played an important role in multi-user computing in the 1980s and 1970s.

Its technology did not keep up with current technology. North Star had disappeared by 1984.

North Star Computers, 1982

Pro-Modem 1200, 1984

Due to the clock integrated into the computer modem in the early ’80s, e-mail could be sent at low rates late at night, when hourly charges for early online services were lowest. It cost a whopping $495 to buy this 1,200 baud modem.
Pro-Modem 1200, 1984